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From Jeanne Guérin to Céline - August 21, 1887.

From Jeanne Guérin to Céline. 21st August 1887.

La Musse, 21st August 87.

My Dear little Céline,

I received your nice kind letter. Thank you for having thought of us travelers, you’re still the same, as cheerful and as spiritual as ever, and I saw that your heart hadn’t changed either since you were good enough to cease your numerous occupations in order to write to me.

Marie and I often talk about you, we are so happy at the moment in the peace and quiet, that our thoughts constantly turn to you who are faithful admirers of nature and God’s wonders. Yes, I think that like us you would be very happy here. Nothing comes to disturb the silence of our retreat, except for the rustle of the wind in the trees, the little birds’ singing and squawking, and sometimes a train going by at the foot of the hill. And nature is so beautiful here, the horizon, which we can see, is so vast, this really is an enchanting region. However there are thorns like everywhere else because Marie is coming down with something. And then we also miss all those who are dear to us and whom we would like to see happy with us. How different it is from Trouville, where you tire of seeing people, here we see absolutely nobody except for Mr. Martel who comes every day at four o’clock with a nun from the Espérance Community who nurses the sick. She’s very good and last night she told us how hard it is being far from her convent and her Sisters. She told us that the longest time she spends in her convent in Paris is between eight and ten days, the rest of the time she [2 r°] travels the world nursing the sick and winning souls for Jesus Christ. I feel very sorry for this poor Sister, she might not be as unhappy as all that, but I believe she needs a good dose of hope to fulfil her duties.

We have very pretty views here, we’re spoiled for choice. I’ve begun a little view of the Castle in the trees, and I spend my days painting, reading, walking, playing billiards and working a little, but very little. I hope I’m keeping you up to date with all my occupations. A week is a long time to go without seeing each other, at least I think so, perhaps you haven’t really noticed how long it’s been, you indifferent little thing. Antoinette Marais’ clothes have perhaps turned your head to the point of forgetting your Jeanne. In the meantime, so that your memory of me doesn’t fade too much from your [2 v°] mind I will come back on Thursday or Friday. Farewell, dear little Céline; I kiss you with all my heart and beg you to give Thérèse a big kiss for me.

Your cousin who loves you tenderly

Jeanne.

Please give a kiss to my uncle for me and papa if you see him.

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